ENVIRONMENT

Remembering the Past With Yerba de Alonso Garcia

 Did Native Americans Name Good Plants after Good People? My friend Andrea once told me that early Americans, like the Navajo and the Apache, named plants with beneficial properties after people they liked. It was sort of a way to compliment the good people in their lives.  She added that snakes, flies, and mosquitoes might be named after people they disliked. ...

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Glyphosate Residues Permeate Food Webs. Here’s How You Can Fight Back.

Photo showing cattle.

A recent (2014) study published by Monika Krüger and colleagues in the Journal of Environmental & Analytical Toxicology  revealed the presence of glyphosate residues in grazing and foraging animals and in people, highlighting key problems associated with a herbicide that targets an entire kingdom of primary producers.  Glyphosate residues were found in hares and rabbits, cattle, and humans, suggesting that the ...

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Popular Herbicide Rounding Up a Multidimensional Disaster

No Chemical Does More to Promote Disease than Glyphosate In the video above,  Dr Alex Vasquez explains why no chemical does more on an international basis to promote disease than glyphosate, the active ingredient in the popular herbicide, Round Up. Efforts of many like Vasquez, who highlights events in Columbia, are making headway around the world. Internationally, one petition online has collected ...

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Will a Lawsuit Against Monsanto Force Tighter Food Safety Regulations?

Mirazie vs. Monsanto The recent filing of a class action lawsuit against Monsanto by Elvis, Edison And Romi Mirazie in the state of California represents the beginning of the windfall microbiologists have anticipated for decades as more individuals recognize the vital role microbes play in human health.  Crowdfunding is being used to support the Mirazie’s effort.  At issue is the ...

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Growing Organic Blackberries in the Desert Requires an Emphasis on Soil Microbiology

Who says you can’t grow blackberries in the desert?  South of the Organ Mountains, near Vado, New Mexico, soils are characterized by heavy calcium carbonate (aka caliche) deposits on or near the surface.  This caliche becomes sticky when wet, binding together to form an impervious, concrete-like layer that water cannot easily drain through. The natural soil pH is between 8 ...

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Chemical Dependency Starts in the Soil

Chemical dependence begins in the soil where our food is grown. Chemical Dependency Is About So Much More Than Recreational Drugs Growing up on the edge of Generation X, I learned early on about the most universally recognized forms of chemical dependency.  In our community, we were exposed to a number of people who drank too much, smoked too much, or ...

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What Endophytes Reveal about GMOs

As mainstream media in the US continue to downplay concerns about the safety of genetically modified foods, bloggers, independent news providers and social media groups continue to voice concerns in and beyond the United States.  Debate centers around the dietary and ecological safety of genetically modified organisms (hence “G-M-O’s”) in our food system. Figure 1.  Endophytic microbes like these blue ...

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Repurposing Victory Gardens

During World Wars I and II, families on the home fronts in many countries were encouraged to plant victory gardens. Home food production was recognized as fundamental to national security, and victory gardens became a source of national pride and patriotism. Food grown at home provided critical relief from the death, famine, and destruction created by the wars. You see, ...

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Why Strawberry Clover in a 21st Century Victory Garden?

     The victory garden of the 21th century must be ecologically balanced so that no chemicals are needed.  To maintain balance, one should choose a variety of plants from different families.  Because space is often limited, plants that serve multiple purposes are always good to have. As a legume, strawberry clover has an ability to associate with microbes of ...

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Water and Organic Matter Make Gardens Productive in Desert Soils

Gardening in the desert presents challenges that are rarely addressed by gardening experts who honed their skills in more humid climates.   Here in the Southwest, it is not uncommon to see precipitation values for the entire year that equal rainfall received in a single storm in more humid climates. When annual precipitation falls below 15 inches, soil, which can ...

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