Cultural Diversity

Five Ways Teachers Can Recharge Their Batteries This Summer

Public School Teaching is Stressful. There has always been a special place in my heart for teachers. My parents both taught in public schools, and my first career was in education. Those teachers who influenced my own life held a love for their subject matter and carried the best interests of their students close to heart. However, I sensed early ...

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Remembering the Past With Yerba de Alonso Garcia

 Did Native Americans Name Good Plants after Good People? My friend Andrea once told me that early Americans, like the Navajo and the Apache, named plants with beneficial properties after people they liked. It was sort of a way to compliment the good people in their lives.  She added that snakes, flies, and mosquitoes might be named after people they disliked. ...

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Resurrecting the Corn Mothers to Make Food Systems Sustainable

Sustainable Food Systems Drive Sustainable Economies In the industrialized world, corporate owned food systems have created low priced, readily available, empty calories with long shelf lives.  This biologically inactive foodstuff (emphasis on stuff) has come at the expense of family farms, rural communities, environmental health, basic human nutrition, and civil liberties.  As a result, the cost of health care associated with ...

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The Trojan Horse of Mandatory Public Education

In the late 19th century, Americans from all walks of life recognized the value of a good education as the foundation of a free society.  It seemed self evident that basic skills like reading, writing, and math were skills that separated the rich from the poor.  Access to education promised a key to upward mobility.  So when mandatory public education ...

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Fungi and the Circle of Life

Why Fungi Represent the Circle of Life People look at me funny when I say that fungi are the circle of life.  Comments range from the disinterested, “Yeah, right.   Whatever,” to the challenging “What are you talking about?” Well, here is what I am talking about. Fungi, particularly microfungi, the kind you need a microscope to see, are critical to ...

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Biodiversity and the Least of Our Brothers

Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye did it unto one of these my brethren, even these least, ye did it unto me.  Matthew 25:40-45 American Standard Version.   Social norms, various laws, and widely shared ethics prevent most of us from killing other human beings. Animal lovers and certain vegans object to the killing of pets, whales, livestock, ...

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How Science, Education, and Government Promote Widespread Chronic Illness

Illness changes the way a person views the world.  I’ve spent much of my life following “scientific principles”  and “medically approved recommendations” for health management and diet.  I always trusted public education to provide information that is helpful to individual citizens.   Remarkably, the only times I’ve reversed any long term illness have been the times I’ve given up on all ...

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A 2012 Christmas Prayer

May the world order now dawning reverse our values, that we may begin to place: health above wealth probiotic above antibiotic natural above synthetic diversity above conformity and evolution by symbiosis above survival of the fittest.

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Dimensions of Affirmative Action

               Yesterday I received my November copy of Imprimis, a terrific little newsletter from Hillsdale College that features thoughtful discussions about education and civil liberty.  Edward Erler’s article therein challenges legislation that promotes equality through reverse discrimination.  His article contributes to recent affirmative action discussions generated by the Supreme Court case Fisher vs. University ...

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